HOW CAN WE PROPEL A STARSHIP TOWARDS LIGHT SPEED? – 1

Let us imagine a journey to a star 10 light years away. We start from Mars orbit and outside the planet’s gravitational pull and use advanced rocket technology to reach Jupiter. This is a journey of 555 million kilometres [km] taking 7-8 months at 100,000 km per hour. [Approx. estimate of future capability]

We use the immense mass of Jupiter to attract and accelerate our craft onto a collision course [initially] and at the critical moment re-fire the advanced rockets to sling our spaceship around the gas giant and onto its new trajectory and new speed of 1 million km/hour.

Now we start the nuclear reactor, the only power plant capable of sustaining thrust over a 20 year journey [unless we discover something remarkable during the next 100 years]. The heat output from this reactor would be used to power a new type of drive capable of pushing our craft towards light speed. I will describe one concept which has been around for decades, surprisingly – the ion drive.

Here a stream of positively charged hydrogen ions [H+] is ejected at high speed from the rear of the object being propelled. The thrust is small but in the vacuum of space even a large object can be manoeuvred and accelerated provided you have enough thrusters. The ion drive of a starship is likely to be 50-80 metres in diameter and each of the thrusters say 5 cm round. You could get over 2 million thrusters in this drive [clustered around the advanced rockets] all contributing their power from the emitting stream of hydrogen ions.

By providing constant sufficient acceleration you would design to accelerate from 0.001c to 0.5c in 1 year [c = speed of light].

Thus our journey to a star 10 light years away would be approximately 23 years – 2 years to accelerate, 20 to get there and 1 year to slow down to a manageable speed to orbit around a target planet of our destination star.

 I’m sure the mathematicians among you can calculate the acceleration required and the typical thrust needed from each tube – can we achieve this in 150 years time?

   I think we can and in 2150 my starship leaves Mars for the star Seren, 10 light years away, in search of – The Blue People of Cloud Planet.                           

 Read the first few chapters of  The Blue People of  Cloud Planet

See the reviews of  The Blue People of Cloud Planet

Find out how to get your copy of The Blue People of Cloud Planet

CAN MAN TRAVEL AT THE SPEED OF LIGHT? – 1

According to our laws of physics the answer is no. But the question for space travellers is how near the speed of light [c] we can get?

Light travels at 300,000 [approx] kilometres per second [186,000 miles per second]. When we look at our sun, not directly of course, we are seeing it as it was 8 minutes and 19 seconds ago. That is the time for light to travel 150 million kilometres [93 million miles]. 

Stars and galaxies are so far away that we express their distances in light years – the distance light travels in 1 year – 10 trillion kilometres [approx] – an unimaginable distance. 

Thus our nearest star is 4.2 light years away, our nearest galaxy 25,000 light years away and the Andromeda galaxy is a staggering 2.5 million light years away. 

For man only stars up to 10 light years away are potentially reachable. But to do this we need to travel at a significant fraction of the speed of light, say between 0.1 and 0.5c and this would equate to a journey time of 100 and 20 years respectively. 

In my view a journey time between 20 and 40 years is the optimum that human beings could tolerate – assuming we can crack hibernation [which I’ll talk about in a later Blog]. Therefore we would need to develop technology to propel a starship at between a quarter and half the speed of light. But can we do this? 

I will discuss the technology for achieving these speeds in my next Blog – but you might like to see how I achieve a journey to a star 10 light years away in The Blue People of Cloud Planet.

So the answer to my basic question is no, but a Dicepteron can!                             

 Read the first few chapters of  The Blue People of  Cloud Planet

See the reviews of  The Blue People of Cloud Planet

Find out how to get your copy of The Blue People of Cloud Planet

WHEN CAN MANKIND REACH THE NEAREST STARS? – 1

There are a number of milestones and challenges for mankind if we are to contemplate travelling to our nearest stars, 5-20 light years away. 

We must first establish a large moon-base towards mid/end of this century. This is feasible because we have discovered vast amounts of ice at the poles giving us water to drink, oxygen to breathe and hydrogen for power.  Structurally, moon-base would look like a huge Eden Project with specially designed plastic interlocking blocks to resist the vacuum.

Then in the early 22nd century we would have a base on Mars. This would be the nerve centre for a star mission and a suitable starship would be constructed in weightless orbit around the planet. Our mission would launch from here and use the huge gravitational pull of Jupiter to accelerate our craft. 

Now there are 3 key technical challenges for us to solve over the next century to make a mission lasting 20 years feasible. Firstly, we have to be able to travel at a significant fraction of the speed of light and secondly we have to develop technology for extended human hibernation by cryo or other techniques. Thirdly, and absolutely vital, we must develop artificial intelligence – computers so powerful and reliable that we can trust them to look after a starship with its precious cargo of hibernating humans throughout a 20 year voyage. I will talk in more detail about each of these in my next few posts. 

To answer my question – I think in about 150 year’s time but I would be fascinated to hear your views. 

 I have visualised such a journey to the stars in my book – The Blue People of Cloud Planet- available as an e-book on Amazon Kindle [eleven 5* reviews] and now available in paperback from Feedaread.                              

 Read the first few chapters of  The Blue People of  Cloud Planet

See the reviews of  The Blue People of Cloud Planet

Find out how to get your copy of The Blue People of Cloud Planet

HOW CAN WE PROPEL A STARSHIP TOWARDS LIGHT SPEED?

Let us imagine a journey to a star 10 light years away. We start from Mars orbit and outside the planet’s gravitational pull and use advanced rocket technology to reach Jupiter. This is a journey of 555 million kilometres [km] taking 7-8 months at 100,000 km per hour. [Approx. estimate of future capability]

We use the immense mass of Jupiter to attract and accelerate our craft onto a collision course [initially] and at the critical moment re-fire the advanced rockets to sling our spaceship around the gas giant and onto its new trajectory and new speed of 1 million km/hour.

Now we start the nuclear reactor, the only power plant capable of sustaining thrust over a 20 year journey [unless we discover something remarkable during the next 100 years]. The heat output from this reactor would be used to power a new type of drive capable of pushing our craft towards light speed. I will describe one concept which has been around for decades, surprisingly – the ion drive.

Here a stream of positively charged hydrogen ions [H+] is ejected at high speed from the rear of the object being propelled. The thrust is small but in the vacuum of space even a large object can be manoeuvred and accelerated provided you have enough thrusters. The ion drive of a starship is likely to be 50-80 metres in diameter and each of the thrusters say 5 cm round. You could get over 2 million thrusters in this drive [clustered around the advanced rockets] all contributing their power from the emitting stream of hydrogen ions.

By providing constant sufficient acceleration you would design to accelerate from 0.001c to 0.5c in 1 year [c = speed of light].

Thus our journey to a star 10 light years away would be approximately 23 years – 2 years to accelerate, 20 to get there and 1 year to slow down to a manageable speed to orbit around a target planet of our destination star.

 I’m sure the mathematicians among you can calculate the acceleration required and the typical thrust needed from each tube – can we achieve this in 150 years time?

   I think we can and in 2150 my starship leaves Mars for the star Seren, 10 light years away, in search of – The Blue People of Cloud Planet.                           

 Read the first few chapters of  The Blue People of  Cloud Planet

See the reviews of  The Blue People of Cloud Planet

Find out how to get your copy of The Blue People of Cloud Planet

CAN MAN TRAVEL AT THE SPEED OF LIGHT?

According to our laws of physics the answer is no. But the question for space travellers is how near the speed of light [c] we can get?

Light travels at 300,000 [approx] kilometres per second [186,000 miles per second]. When we look at our sun, not directly of course, we are seeing it as it was 8 minutes and 19 seconds ago. That is the time for light to travel 150 million kilometres [93 million miles]. 

Stars and galaxies are so far away that we express their distances in light years – the distance light travels in 1 year – 10 trillion kilometres [approx] – an unimaginable distance. 

Thus our nearest star is 4.2 light years away, our nearest galaxy 25,000 light years away and the Andromeda galaxy is a staggering 2.5 million light years away. 

For man only stars up to 10 light years away are potentially reachable. But to do this we need to travel at a significant fraction of the speed of light, say between 0.1 and 0.5c and this would equate to a journey time of 100 and 20 years respectively. 

In my view a journey time between 20 and 40 years is the optimum that human beings could tolerate – assuming we can crack hibernation [which I’ll talk about in a later Blog]. Therefore we would need to develop technology to propel a starship at between a quarter and half the speed of light. But can we do this? 

I will discuss the technology for achieving these speeds in my next Blog – but you might like to see how I achieve a journey to a star 10 light years away in The Blue People of Cloud Planet.

So the answer to my basic question is no, but a Dicepteron can!                             

 Read the first few chapters of  The Blue People of  Cloud Planet

See the reviews of  The Blue People of Cloud Planet

Find out how to get your copy of The Blue People of Cloud Planet

WHEN CAN MANKIND REACH THE NEAREST STARS?

There are a number of milestones and challenges for mankind if we are to contemplate travelling to our nearest stars, 5-20 light years away. 

We must first establish a large moon-base towards mid/end of this century. This is feasible because we have discovered vast amounts of ice at the poles giving us water to drink, oxygen to breathe and hydrogen for power.  Structurally, moon-base would look like a huge Eden Project with specially designed plastic interlocking blocks to resist the vacuum.

Then in the early 22nd century we would have a base on Mars. This would be the nerve centre for a star mission and a suitable starship would be constructed in weightless orbit around the planet. Our mission would launch from here and use the huge gravitational pull of Jupiter to accelerate our craft. 

Now there are 3 key technical challenges for us to solve over the next century to make a mission lasting 20 years feasible. Firstly, we have to be able to travel at a significant fraction of the speed of light and secondly we have to develop technology for extended human hibernation by cryo or other techniques. Thirdly, and absolutely vital, we must develop artificial intelligence – computers so powerful and reliable that we can trust them to look after a starship with its precious cargo of hibernating humans throughout a 20 year voyage. I will talk in more detail about each of these in my next few posts. 

To answer my question – I think in about 150 year’s time but I would be fascinated to hear your views. 

 I have visualised such a journey to the stars in my book – The Blue People of Cloud Planet- available as an e-book on Amazon Kindle [eleven 5* reviews] and now available in paperback from Feedaread.                              

 Read the first few chapters of  The Blue People of  Cloud Planet

See the reviews of  The Blue People of Cloud Planet

Find out how to get your copy of The Blue People of Cloud Planet